Friday, April 19, 2013

Student Takeaways from the 2013 Kelley Direct Marketing Conference – Multi-channel Marketing Company Tour


The Kelley Direct Marketing Club hosted the first ever national marketing conference for our online MBA program this year. On March 29 and 30 the Kelley Direct Students got together in Chicago to learn from some of the biggest marketing companies in the world as well as from start-ups who that just beginning to make a name for themselves. With the initiative of our student members and the support of the Kelley School of Business and the Kelley Direct Marketing team we were able to put together 2 days of interactive marketing education, networking and fun.

Here are some of the key takeaways that the attendees including myself have shared from the first day of the conference – the Multi-Channel Marketing Company Tour:

Key Takeaways from Ogilvy & Mather - Chicago


1. “Compete with the immortals!!!” - David Ogilvy  
You have to set your sights high and have a vision as a leader, you’ll only go as far as you aspire to go. David started with two people and zero clients in 1948 and said he wanted to be at the top. Now Ogilvy is one of the 8 largest advertising networks in the world.

2.  “Unless your ad has a big idea, your campaign will pass like a ship in the night.”
If I were to say “logistics” what comes to your mind? That’s right, Ogilvy came up with that “big idea” for UPS and won a 2012 effie advertising award for it. The company’s founder has many more big ideas and you can find them all over the walls in the Ogilvy office:


  • “We sell – or else.”
  • “If we hire people who are larger than we are, we’ll become a company of giants.”
  • “Be resilient, kind, and honest”
  • “One agency indivisible”

3. Open concept seating (no high-walled cubes) is better for interaction and it’s not only meant for creative teams – Ogilvy Chicago’s whole place was very open and full of natural light. Having a wide variety of spaces with different sizes and privacy levels gives employees the flexibility and freedom they need. There was a quiet buzz of energy everywhere we went in their office, and I’m sure that was intentional.

Key Takeaways from Google - Chicago


1. Google offers many free tools for marketers: http://www.google.com/think/products-tools/planning-tools.html. When you don’t have a lot of time or resources, these free tools can help you make business decisions by letting you explore trends in people’s online behavior.
Direct links to other Google Tools:



2. Setup Google alerts notifications not only for your keywords, but for your competitors as well. This will help you keep track of their public activity very easily: http://www.google.com/alerts

3. There is an unlimited amount of data, but the data alone isn’t useful. Look for insights behind the data - What are people saying about a certain topic? How are they engaging with your website? What are consumers interested in during this time of year? How do searches in different states vary and why?

Key Takeaways from SocialKaty


1. After you figure out what you’re good at, double down and stick to it. It’s okay to turn down business if you know your chance of success is not good. When they figured out that B2B was tough for them they turned those types of clients down.
·       Side note: If you’re in a B2B marketing department and are wondering how to use social media – think about how you can position the company as a thought leader. If you’re able to show your potential clients you know what you’re talking about and offer sound advice, then they will trust you with their business.

2. Define your target market and then prove your ROI. Use analytics to figure out which user is most useful and reachable, and then determine the pathway to that individual. It’s easy to start with the shotgun approach of marketing when you’re a new company, but it will pay to know who you want to go after and zeroing in on them with the appropriate marketing messages.

3. If you want to go into the social media and digital marketing industry, be prepared to defend your social “klout” - everyone can see how “experienced” you are by your online footprint and employers will look at your LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, etc. If you show that you care about your personal brand, then companies will know you are capable of doing the same for other brands.

In our next post, we’ll share the key takeaways from all of the speakers at the Kelley Direct Multi-Channel Marketing Conference on Saturday March 30.

For more takeaways and updates from the conference search for #KDConference on Twitter.

About the Contributors

Pathik Bhatt, a current Kelley Direct MBA student, is the Online Marketer for HALO Branded Solutions and the VP of Integrated Marketing for the Kelley Direct Marketing Club. Follow Pathik on his website: www.pathikbhatt.com.